Two Double-Ram Zun: World Renowned Chinese Bronzes from the Nezu Museum and the British Museum = Futatsu no s y son: Nezu bijutsukan to Daiei Hakubutsukan no meihin. Mamoru Hirokawa.
Two Double-Ram Zun: World Renowned Chinese Bronzes from the Nezu Museum and the British Museum = Futatsu no s y son: Nezu bijutsukan to Daiei Hakubutsukan no meihin
Two Double-Ram Zun: World Renowned Chinese Bronzes from the Nezu Museum and the British Museum = Futatsu no s y son: Nezu bijutsukan to Daiei Hakubutsukan no meihin
Two Double-Ram Zun: World Renowned Chinese Bronzes from the Nezu Museum and the British Museum = Futatsu no s y son: Nezu bijutsukan to Daiei Hakubutsukan no meihin
Two Double-Ram Zun: World Renowned Chinese Bronzes from the Nezu Museum and the British Museum = Futatsu no s y son: Nezu bijutsukan to Daiei Hakubutsukan no meihin
Two Double-Ram Zun: World Renowned Chinese Bronzes from the Nezu Museum and the British Museum = Futatsu no s y son: Nezu bijutsukan to Daiei Hakubutsukan no meihin

Two Double-Ram Zun: World Renowned Chinese Bronzes from the Nezu Museum and the British Museum = Futatsu no s y son: Nezu bijutsukan to Daiei Hakubutsukan no meihin

[Tokyo]: Nezu Museum, 2015. Softcover. Yellow & illus. wraps, 48 pp., many color illus., map. VG. Item #152291
ISBN: 9784930817662

Text is in English and Japanese. Issued in conjunction with a 2015 exhibition that brings together two similar pieces, from their new homes half a world apart. The Nezu Museum's "Double-Run Zu is thought to belong to a category of wine vessel usually associated with the Shang dynasty and thought to be for ritual use. What makes this zun particularly noteworthy is its distinctive form, with two rams joined back to back, one on each side of the central vessel. The two known examples of such zun, one in the Nezu Museum and the other in the British Museum, pose many puzzles, lacking as they do inscriptions or records of where they unearthed. It had been thought that both were produced at about the same period for the Shang court, which had its capital in what is now Henan province, in the Yellow River basin. Recent research on bronzes has, however, revealed that it is highly likely that these zun were from a separate culture along the middle reaches of the Yangtze River (Hunan province) contemporaneous with the Shang. Through focusin on the differences in the sculptural qualities and production techniques visible in these two works, the mysteries surrounding these double-ram zun are being unravelled, little by litte." (intro) With essays by Mamoru Hirokawa, Quanyu Wang, and Sascha Priewe, and many full-color examples of the two bronze sculptures. Scarce.

Price: $38.00 save 10% $34.20

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